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Discover the berry shrubs in our gardens

Discover the berry shrubs in our gardens

In the fall, while the foliage of some trees is ablaze with fire-colored tones, other varieties play the color card through their fruits. The visual effect is more discreet but nevertheless profound for anyone who takes the time to look at these small red, purple, black, orange or white berries that are available to the eye. After the varieties that make up wild hedges, let's discover other varieties, domestic this time, capable of brightening up a clump or hedge with the charm of their small round fruits. Most often toxic, these berries are only intended for human eyes. Birds, on the other hand, will find there material for delicious feasts. One more reason to invite these species into your garden!

Discover the berry shrubs in our gardens


J-F. Mahé ** Pyracantha ** What is the connection between pyracanta and piranha? In addition to a name with a fairly similar sound, these two species, one plant, the other animal, have a certain bite in common! This shrub is indeed famous for its large sharp thorns. As they grow, the pyracanta foliage will form a dense and impassable network. Interesting for anyone who wants both decorative and protective hedges! This shrub, also called "burning bush", is available in several colors: yellow, orange and red.

Discover the berry shrubs in our gardens


J-F. Mahé ** The cotoneaster ** Here is a shrub that has almost as many fruits as leaves ... It is this profusion that gives the cotoneaster all its decorative power. After flowering which occurs in May, the shrub is covered with fruit - or drupes - from October. Depending on the variety, the cotoneaster will be used as a ground cover, as an isolated subject or as a hedge. Particularly rustic, it will succeed everywhere, whatever the nature of the soil.

Discover the berry shrubs in our gardens


J-F. Mahé ** Creeping cotoneaster ** This other variety of cotoneaster is called "Cotoneaster horizontalis" or "creeping". This time it is a deciduous variety, often used as a ground cover on slopes. This variety is particularly decorative in the fall when its foliage turns red before falling.

Discover the berry shrubs in our gardens


J-F. Mahé ** Common privet ** Ligustrum, also called common privet, is particularly appreciated in hedges because of its hardiness, its ability to bear pruning as well as its decorative interest. Note, however, that the berries only appear on the pruned branches. If this spectacle is what you are looking for, use it as a wild hedge.

Discover the berry shrubs in our gardens


J-F. Mahé ** Holly ** With its clusters of red berries, its shiny and sharp foliage - which rubs there pricks! - you will have recognized holly, "Ilex" from its Latin name. The variety that we present here is distinguished from common holly by its hemmed leaves of a cream shade. The berries appear in the fall and remain hung until March. The growth of holly is slow, but its decorative interest evident. So plant it without delay to take advantage of its show as long as possible and introduce it to future generations, because its longevity is exceptional!

Discover the berry shrubs in our gardens


J-F. Mahé ** Symphorine ** Symphorine: this shrub with a charming name is distinguished by its large round and white berries, particularly decorative. The charm of snow before the time of the first snowflakes!

Discover the berry shrubs in our gardens


J-F. Mahé ** Le callicarpa ** Here is a shrub that will not fail to surprise anyone who comes across it for the first time! With its clusters of purple fruits, it is unlike any of the species in our gardens. So dare the purple and enjoy the spectacle of these colorful berries until Christmas!

Discover the berry shrubs in our gardens


J-F. Mahé ** The olive tree ** Iconic plant of the south, the olive tree is however a winter plant. Indeed, its fruits do not mature until the end of the year, between October and December. They thus need 6 months to form and mature, the fruits gradually coloring to change from green to black or purple depending on the species. If your climate allows, taste the decorative charm of this tree, which is recommended both by its silvery foliage and the flavor of its fruits!

Discover the berry shrubs in our gardens


J-F. Mahé ** The Japanese quince ** It is in spring that the Japanese quince appears in all its splendor, with these naked stems, with particularly elegant antlers, covered with pink or red flowers. However, it finds a decorative interest in the fall in favor of its yellow fruits which can be eaten cooked, like those of quince from our regions.